Hire Attorneys Paralegals Case Managers Legal Aids File Clerks Other Roles

Legal Staffing & Recruitment Solutions

Legal Roles We Place

Our Specialties

Attorney

An attorney, also called a lawyer, advises clients and represents them and their legal rights in both criminal and civil cases. This can begin with imparting advice, then proceed with preparing documents and pleadings and sometimes, ultimately, appearing in court to advocate on behalf of clients.

Attorney Duties & Responsibilities

Attorneys’ responsibilities can cover a wide range of duties, and they might vary somewhat depending upon the area of law in which they practice. Some common duties include:

  • Advise clients regarding ongoing litigation or to explain legal issues they might be facing or have concerns about.
  • Research the details and evidence involved in cases, such as police reports, accident reports, or pleadings previously filed in a case, as well as applicable law.
  • Interpret case law and decisions handed down by other applicable courts. This can involve analyzing the effects of a good many factors that might have been involved in other cases.
  • Develop case strategies, such as trying to resolve cases early and cost-effectively for his clients rather than go to trial.
  • Prepare pleadings and other documents, such as contracts, deeds, and wills.
  • Appear in court before a judge or jury to orally defend a client’s rights and best interests.

Attorneys can be general practitioners, or they might specialize in any one of a number of areas, such as criminal law, real estate, corporate issues, estate and probate matters, intellectual property, matrimonial and family law, or environmental law.

Primary responsibilities

  • Represent clients in court during criminal and civil trials.
  • Specialize in areas such as bankruptcy, probate, international, elder, or environmental law.
  • Counsel clients about their legal rights and obligations.
  • Suggest courses of action.
  • Research the intent of laws and past judicial decisions and incorporate findings into suggestions.
  • Apply law to specific circumstances.
  • Conduct extensive research before trials.
  • Interview clients and witnesses.
  • Take statements.
  • Prepare opening and closing arguments.
  • Confer with judges and other attorneys.
  • Present evidence and exhibitions.
  • Describe crime scenes.
  • Request for evidence to be present for trials.
  • Help protect claims to copyrights, programs, and product designs.
  • Advise insurance companies about legality of transactions.
  • Help companies write policies.
  • Protect companies from unwarranted claims.
  • Represent companies in court.
  • Represent individuals who have been charged with crimes and argue their cases in courts of law.
  • Assist clients with litigation, wills, trusts, contracts, mortgages, titles, and leases.
  • Advise companies concerning legal issues related to its business activities.
  • Advise companies on issues regarding patents, government regulations, contracts with other companies, property interests, or collective-bargaining agreements with unions.
Law Firm Admin

Professional law firm administrators may make important contributions to the financial and operating success of their law firms. The value of these administrators can increase as they apply business principles to their firms and to enhance productivity by:

  • Developing automation to insure the delivery of high quality legal services,
  • Maintaining, analyzing and interpreting financial data and management information for the Managing Partner and the partners,
  • Managing/coordinating the human resources functions for the administrative support staff,
  • Providing administrative management support to those partners who are responsible for substantive areas of the practice and
  • Performing/coordinating all of the other operational functions required of a growth oriented law firm.
File Clerk

Legal File Clerk Job Responsibilities

Legal file clerks are responsible for following a filing system and organizing records, such as letters, legal documents, case files, correspondence, invoices and memoranda according to that system. They locate and retrieve requested files, as well as prepare legal document indices, file folders and labels. They may be responsible for keeping files up-to-date. In addition to filing, legal file clerks may perform other clerical duties, such as handling mail, faxing, using a copy machine, maintaining a calendar, managing office equipment and ordering supplies.

Legal File Clerk Requirements

There are no formal education requirements to become a legal file clerk, but most employers prefer job candidates who have at least a high school diploma or its equivalent. Most of the knowledge needed to become a file clerk is learned on the job. On-the-job training may include legal filing practices and procedures. Trainees also learn legal filing systems and other guidelines specific to their employer. If the legal file clerk will have other office duties, training may extend beyond filing procedures to supply management, the operation of office machinery and mail sorting.

Mediator

Responsible for acting as a middleman to resolve disputes and help parties come to a resolution. Helps parties settle disputes out of court.

Primary responsibilities

  • Assist with mediating disputes out of court.
  • Set up appointments for mediation.
  • Conduct first meetings with parties to outline arbitration process.
  • Determine fees and fee schedule.
  • Facilitate open communication between parties.
  • Obtain disputes from the opposing parties.
  • Interview parties to clarify issues and develop a more clear understanding of dispute.
  • Weigh both sides to come to a final and nonbonding decision.
  • Hear arguments for both sides.
  • Offer suggestions or legal advice to resolve disputes.
  • Draw terms of a settlement that are either binding or non-binding.
  • Keep all material and proceedings confidential.
  • Guide parties to a settlement.
  • Prepare documents for parties to sign.
  • Preside over executive minitrials, early neutral evaluations, and summary jury trials.
  • Identify the main issues and explore the possibility of settlement.
  • Assist the parties by indicating procedural recommendations.
  • Explain terms of non-binding or binding verdicts.
  • Analyze evidence and apply relevant laws, regulations, and policies.
Paralegal

Paralegals support lawyers by maintaining, drafting documents, and organizing files, calling on legal witnesses, maintaining a legal library and more. They are also known as a legal assistant or legal secretary.

Paralegal Responsibilities:

  • Preparing affidavits, legal correspondence and other documents for attorneys.
  • Organizing and maintaining documents in a paper or electronic filing system.
  • Meeting with clients, attorneys, and other professionals to talk about case details.
  • Filing pleadings with court clerk.
  • Helping prepare for trial by organizing exhibits and assisting with other tasks as needed.
  • Preparing briefs, wills, contracts, real estate closing statements, pleadings, appeals, and other legal documents.
  • Investigating facts and laws of cases and searching public records and other resources to prepare cases and determine causes of action.
  • Directing and coordinating law office activity, including delivery of subpoenas.
  • Gathering and analyzing statutes, decisions, and legal articles, codes, documents and other data.
  • Calling on witnesses to testify at hearings.
  • Keeping law library up-to-date by monitoring legal volumes.

They may work for a family law office, corporate legal department, company in-house counsel, personal injury attorney, real estate attorney, and many other types of lawyers.

Case Manager

The Legal Case Manager major duties, tasks, and responsibilities that usually make up the work functions of most legal case managers:

  • Conduct research to investigate the facts of a case in order to obtain useful information
  • Prepare legal documents and articles required for a case preparation
  • File appeals, exhibits and briefs with a court clerk or opposing legal counsel
  • Manage and organize legal information by ensuring proper archiving or storage on electronic-filing systems
  • Collect, arrange, and preserve evidence and other useful document required for a legal proceeding
  • Oversee the drafting of client and legal correspondence documents such as mortgages and contracts
  • Contact clients to update them on the progress of a case as well as reply their enquiries or forward to an attorney
  • Oversee the delivery of subpoenas and court summons to witnesses and other concerned individuals
  • Schedule and arrange client meetings with attorney
  • Notify an attorney or law firm of the time frame or deadlines for a case preparation
  • Establish good working relationship with clients in order to obtain vital information required in preparing for a case
  • Respond to clients and obtain their correspondence in absence of an attorney
  • Review trial transcripts, take notes during legal proceedings and handle exhibits
  • Organize and manage legal volumes to ensure they are up-to-date
  • Prepare case summaries and other documents which support a case preparation.
Legal Analyst

Legal Analysts work for a variety of organizations and provide support to attorneys and paralegals. Typical work responsibilities of a Legal Analyst are conducting research, helping with legal proceedings, preparing client invoices, inspecting testimony, managing legal documents, and reporting to the general counsel. Based on our collection of resume samples, main job requirements are legal knowledge, organizational skills, teamwork, business acumen, effective communication, time management, and computer competences. Successful resumes make display of at least an Associate’s Degree in paralegal studies.

Document Coder

Legal coding is the process of creating summary or keyword data from a document. It is widely used in the legal profession to create a fast-search index or database of documents for use in litigation.

Objective Coding Definitions

  • The recording of basic data such as date, author, or document type, from documents into a database.
  • Extracting information from electronic documents such as date created, author recipient, CC and linking each image to the information in pre-defined objective fields. In direct opposition to Subjective Coding where legal interpretations of data in a document are linked to individual documents. Also called bibliographic coding.
  • Extracting such information from a document as its author, its mailing date, etc. Objective coding is usually done from the document text or image, because the metadata may be inaccurate. For example, a document written and signed by a partner might show the administrative assistant as the author in the metadata, because it was originally typed on the assistant’s computer.
Legal Services Director

Oversees the activities of the organization’s legal department. Provides legal advice, interpretation, and guidance to senior management and officers regarding contracts, state/federal regulatory requirements, intellectual property or trademark protection, and other business matters. Reviews all information and prepares defense for any legal actions against the organization or advises on prosecuting lawsuits on behalf of the organization. Coordinates and reviews the work of internal or external legal staff. Manages staff of attorneys. Requires a Juris Doctor degree from an accredited law school. Requires admittance to a state bar. Typically reports to top management. Typically manages through subordinate managers and professionals in larger groups of moderate complexity. Provides input to strategic decisions that affect the functional area of responsibility. May give input into developing the budget. Typically requires 3+ years of managerial experience. Capable of resolving escalated issues arising from operations and requiring coordination with other departments.

Arbitrator

Arbitrator: If both parties agree, an arbitrator can help settle a legal disagreement directly between parties, instead of going through the court system.

Legal Secretary

Legal File Clerk Job Responsibilities

Legal file clerks are responsible for following a filing system and organizing records, such as letters, legal documents, case files, correspondence, invoices and memoranda according to that system. They locate and retrieve requested files, as well as prepare legal document indices, file folders and labels. They may be responsible for keeping files up-to-date. In addition to filing, legal file clerks may perform other clerical duties, such as handling mail, faxing, using a copy machine, maintaining a calendar, managing office equipment and ordering supplies.

Legal File Clerk Requirements

There are no formal education requirements to become a legal file clerk, but most employers prefer job candidates who have at least a high school diploma or its equivalent. Most of the knowledge needed to become a file clerk is learned on the job. On-the-job training may include legal filing practices and procedures. Trainees also learn legal filing systems and other guidelines specific to their employer. If the legal file clerk will have other office duties, training may extend beyond filing procedures to supply management, the operation of office machinery and mail sorting.

Other Legal Roles

Legal Positions

  • Arbitrator: If both parties agree, an arbitrator can help settle a legal disagreement directly between parties, instead of going through the court system.
  • Attorney: Also known as lawyers, attorneys are advocates for their clients’ rights. This can involve everything from offering advice to creating or reviewing contracts to representing clients in court. 
  • Case manager: These roles are largely administrative. Case managers track paperwork, dates, and other important information about a case. This legwork helps attorneys focus on big-picture strategies.
  • Jury consultant: Jury consultants, also known as trial consultants, help lawyers choose a jury that’s likely to return a verdict in their favor. They also prep witnesses, evaluate deposition transcripts, and organize mock trials.
  • Law firm administrator: The person in this role oversees day-to-day operations for a firm. 
  • Legal analyst: These specialists work alongside lawyers. They may conduct research, gather evidence, or otherwise help attorneys build a case.
  • Legal services director: Legal services directors usually work for large organizations that include a legal department. They lead the legal department as it works toward the larger goals of the organization.
  • Mediator: Unlike a lawyer, a mediator is a neutral third party and doesn’t represent anyone person involved in a legal matter. Mediators are non-biased negotiators for all parties involved in the dispute, and they work to resolve everyone’s issues and come to a mutual understanding and agreement without a judge or jury. They can work in legal administration, labor unions, and the arts, for instance. They can also specialize in a particular area, like divorce mediation.
  • Paralegal: The American Association for Paralegal Education defines paralegal work as substantive and procedural legal work which would otherwise be performed by an attorney. In other words, a paralegal is far more than a lawyer’s assistant or case manager. Their work includes legal research and presentations, interviewing clients, drafting legal documents, and law office administration.

Court Positions

These are the people you’ll see working in court. Not all will take on as noticeable roles as a judge, for instance, but they’re all crucial to the day-to-day operations of a courtroom.

  • Bailiff: Bailiffs are officers of the court, responsible for keeping the courtroom safe. They escort people, including jurors and defendants, to and from the courtroom.
  • Court advocate: A court advocate, or victim’s advocate, is trained to support crime victims. They may go to court with the victim, or they may help outside of court by providing information, emotional support, access to resources, or assistance with paperwork. Some victim’s advocates run crisis hotlines, organize support groups, or provide counseling.
  • Court messenger: As you might expect, people in this role are responsible for getting files, documents, and evidence where it needs to go. 
  • Court transcriptionist: Also called a court reporter, court transcriptionists listen to oral testimony and turn it into an accurate written record. Court transcriptionists are usually stenographers who use a special machine to produce a transcript of the proceedings. However, they may also use a voice recorder which is a special mask allowing for narration into a computer that uses speech recognition software to create a transcript.
  • Judge: The judge presides over the court and ensures that the case proceeds in a fair, impartial, and just manner.
  • Litigation docket manager: A litigation docket manager manages an organization’s litigation docket file and records. They also ensure the calendar is regularly updated. They may also oversee the docketing database or train staff to manage it.
  • Magistrate: Magistrate judges are a part of the U.S. federal court system. They assist district court judges. There are also magistrate judges in state court systems, where they similarly serve a lower-level position.

Administrative

Though these roles differ somewhat, they’re all similar in that they involve performing administrative tasks that keep the wheels of the legal system spinning.

  • Administrative assistant
  • Clerk
  • Copy center professional
  • Document coder
  • File clerk
  • Legal aide/assistant
  • Legal secretary
  • Mailroom personnel
  • Legal records manager

Contract Positions and Other Miscellaneous Legal Careers

  • Contract administrator
  • Contract analyst
  • Contract drafting legal specialist
  • Consultant
  • Regulatory affairs director
  • Right of way agent
  • Software consultant

Our Process

Recruitment Excellence

We love technology,  but we love people even more! Our recruitment process starts with the right job description. We source the perfect candidate list match from our national database, using our in-house algorithms. We screen candidates & interview them in person, check references & qualifications. We present you with the best fit to meet your requirements.  Voila!

Referral Program

That Simply Works!

We believe in sharing the love! If you refer us to great companies and/or great talent, we’ll be happy to offer you up to $1000 in rewards. You don’t need to register or be a client!  Contact Us today! Some terms apply.
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